Victoria Almaguer – Taking coronavirus lifestyle changes day by day

During this pandemic, we have seen how businesses have been affected and the livedsof many have changed. Although there have been stressful times, this time of social distancing has helped me learn to take each day step-by-step. For me, this has been a time to adapt to unemployment, going to school online and cooking at home. Becoming a chefCooking has become such a stress reliever and it has become such a blessing for my family. Fast food was our main ritual, but now cooking at home feels more right and safe.

Surviving lockdown at home: How to avoid drama with your family

Being stuck in a house with five other people isolating together during the pandemic can be stressful. But there is a secret recipe for success. Here are six tips on how to keep harmony in your home. 1. Divide and conquer

There are six people living in my house, which means the house gets dirty every single second.

Gabriel Montellano – Thoughts on college graduation when there’s nowhere to go

Being a part of a college class graduating this spring semester is a surreal feeling. All of us who have worked so hard over the years to get to where we are today were looking forward to walking across the graduation stage with our diplomas. Then COVID-19 came. We went from being excited to walk out of our classroom building one last time knowing we didn’t have classes anymore to being at home looking at a screen and saying our goodbyes in video courses. What started as a warning to not go anywhere public and stay home to avoid the possible spread of coronavirus is now an obligation for those of us who don’t want to take the risk of getting sick and possibly spreading it to loved ones.

Growing up along with the rise of emojis and gifs

If there is one thing that I have noticed about my life, it is that language has been changing. Being part of a generation practically obsessed with social media has made me and millions of others aware that these platforms are no longer just about posting that perfect selfie or unfriending that one person because you feel petty. It has made me realize that online culture has influenced the way I, and most millennials, write. We are hooked on the screens of our computers, tablets and phones, which makes it inevitable that formal writing is just not a common thing anymore. There are new words and new meanings of old words – not to mention several ways to respond to someone online.

News media complicit in perpetuating micro aggressions that devalue Latinos, researchers say

Under this President, there has been a predictable rise in white nationalism, hate crimes, and the soul-crushing violence against Spanish-speaking immigrants and anyone who might sound or look like one. The August 3 attack on the people of our binational community of El Paso woke us up to the realization that legality or illegality was never the real issue; language and skin color was, as the black population in the U.S. has long known.  Many far more articulate and thick-skinned than I have dissected, addressed, and contextualized these sentiments and behaviors. I hope to use this space, instead, to address smaller, more hidden behaviors, invisible to most except to those who are targeted; behaviors that the media are not addressing, because they are either complacent or complicit.  These behaviors have been termed “microaggressions,” an expression first used in the 1970s by a psychiatrist, Dr. Chester Pierce, and defined by Columbia professor Deral Sue as:
“brief and commonplace daily verbal, behavioral, or environmental indignities, whether intentional or unintentional, that communicate hostile, derogatory, or negative racial slights and insults toward people of color.” 
Some examples of racial microaggressions include such phrases as “but where are you really from?” or “funny, you don’t sound like a _______.”  More examples can be found at the following website. https://sph.umn.edu/site/docs/hewg/microaggressions.pdf.  Even better, read Claudia Rankine’s prose/poetry book, Citizen. Linguistic anthropologist Jane Hill coined another term similar to microaggression as she turned her attention to the racialized use of Spanish by Anglos in Latinx communities in the Southwest: mock Spanish.  Web sites that examine mock Spanish and its influence include the following: https://www.kibin.com/essay-examples/the-prevalence-of-mock-spanish-in-the-american-media-zbbf20N7; https://www.latinorebels.com/2016/10/20/trump-relies-on-mock-spanish-to-talk-about-immigration-opinion/; https://languagesinconflict.wordpress.com/tag/mock-spanish/. 
My understanding of the term is that privileged white speakers can say and do small things that indicate superiority to or derision of minorities without being held accountable.  This behavior can be disguised as humor or ignorance or deemed to be irrelevant by the speaker.

5 anime shows not named Dragonball you should watch

Anime is a style of film and television animation, typically aimed at adults as well as children. The Dragonball series is arguably the most popular of the genre today. The list below is for the anime novice that is interested in watching anime, but does not know where to begin. The order does not necessarily mean rank. 1.

La rica tradición de requesón en Jalisco

RANCHO ESCONDIDA, JALISCO — Una de las delicias más populares y exquisitas en México son los quesos. Existen cientos de tipos de queso que varían desde su consistencia hasta su sabor. Por ejemplo, hay desde el queso Oaxaca que es usado en quesadillas hasta el queso Panela que se sirve acompañado de nopales. En mi viaje a Rancho Escondida, Jalisco, note que uno de los quesos más famosos y más pedidos por la gente es el requesón. Esto me llamó mucho la atención y quise averiguar porqué es tan popular entre la población y el proceso de cómo es hecho este queso.

How comics conventions helped me embrace my geekdom IRL

I have been a geek since I was a kid. I love comic books, I love video games, I love superhero movies and I love dressing up like my favorite characters. I love being a geek. Although this lifestyle may seem odd to some people, it brings a lot of fun and joy to geeks like me and those around them. When I was young, I was criticized by many people for being a geek, but now I am encouraged to embrace the nerd within.

Through ‘Homecoming’ Beyoncé hits chords on cultural pride and her teachings reach new learners

I am Mexican-American – more Mexican than American if I’m being honest – living in a city where we don’t really experience racism because it has a predominantly Hispanic population. My culture tends to have a lot of machismo where women are seen as less than the man. So when I started following Beyonce’s work, I was woken up with topics I was unaware of related to racism, police brutality against Blacks, white privilege, and feminism.I’ve been a Beyonce fan since 2008. Through her work I have learned what being a feminist means and the history, the struggles and the pride of African-Americans. Although I would like to talk about all the ways she has inspired me, I’m only going to focus on her most recent piece of art.Beyonce debuted as a director and producer when her film Homecoming premiered on Netflix on April 17, 2019.

Putting the ‘her’ in hero: Why Hollywood needs superheroines

After 10 years and 20 films, Marvel Studios did the apparently unthinkable: released a woman-led superhero film. In the two months since its release, “Captain Marvel” has smashed box office expectations, raking in over $1 billion worldwide and having the third largest worldwide opening weekend ever for a superhero film behind “Avengers: Endgame” and “Avengers: Infinity War.”
What has been even bigger though, is the debate the film has set off. Because apparently some people still feel that films highlighting women – especially in the superhero genre – are unnecessary. While many fans praise the much-needed representation and empowerment for young girls and women who are fans of Marvel that the film provided, some took issue with Marvel’s decision to place a woman hero at the forefront.The film was subject to a troll campaign, with some trying – and failing – to boycott the film in order to tank its box office numbers. Others organized a smear campaign on film aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, leaving negative reviews of the film before it was even released.